Rebel Human Resources Podcast

RHR 133: AI Onboarding with Natalie Monbiot

January 03, 2023 Kyle Roed, The HR Guy Season 3 Episode 133
Rebel Human Resources Podcast
RHR 133: AI Onboarding with Natalie Monbiot
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Join Kyle Roed as he speaks with Natalie Monbiot, Head of Strategy at Hour One,
an AI video generating platform used in onboarding and L&D. The age-old problem of perfecting the onboarding process that has been a difficult science for many employers to nail down. With traditional processes continuously leading to poor cultural fits and slow starts, HR professionals have long sought out to find the solution to this chemistry problem.  

This is where AI-generated avatar videos can be useful tool. By nature they are consistent, always covering the necessary points, and automated as you can update them with the latest guidelines with a touch of a button. They can also be engaging as they are human like and can be programed to onboard in numerous languages.  

Natalie speaks to the endless possibilities of AI-generated videos and avatars and how they have been helping brands expand their HR departments resources in a cost-effective manner. She can also share how companies are putting the human experience first in a more technological way. 

Natalie’s Profile

linkedin.com/in/natlikethat

Website

Twitter

Rebel HR is a podcast for HR professionals and leaders of people who are ready to make some disruption in the world of work.

We'll be discussing topics that are disruptive to the world of work and talk about new and different ways to approach solving those problems.

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Natalie Monbiot:

It really is about authenticity, you can communicate authentically, but using technology, so maybe a better question is, is it authentic? Or are we being authentic? Then kind of getting into the conversation about but is it real? And what if people don't think it's free or things like that, but is it authentic and I think a lot goes into authenticity. And a lot of that is branding and just trust built over time.

Kyle Roed:

This is the rebel HR Podcast, the podcast where we talk to HR innovators about all things people leadership. If you're looking for places to find about new ways to think about the world of work, this is the podcast for you. Please subscribe in your favorite podcast listening platform today. And leave us a review revelon HR rebels Welcome back. revelator. Our listeners extremely excited for the conversation. Today. I am just regretting that I did not hit record about 15 minutes ago, when Natalie and I were first talking with us today we have Natalie mon vo she is the head of strategy at our one which is an AI video generating platform used in onboarding and l&d. And we are going to dig into all sorts of things related to what they do at our one. Welcome to the show, Natalie.

Natalie Monbiot:

Thanks so much, Kyle.

Kyle Roed:

So I want to expand upon some of the work that you do as the head of strategy at our one so so if we could take a step back, give us a little bit of an overview of what our one does, and what your role is there.

Natalie Monbiot:

For sure. So it was all gonna sound a little wild, maybe, but maybe not to your rebel human resource audience, we are actually a virtual human company. And what we do is we create virtual humans that are based on real humans. And we do this with the purpose of enabling better communications, and to enable higher productivity for human beings in the workforce. So we have a library of about 150 virtual human characters that can be brought to life and animated just from text. And we enable the content to be created in just minutes with the text based content that you already have. And we also provide, which is very new, immersive 3d environment. So you can create on brand news rooms, or office spaces, or way more imaginative, immersive backgrounds that fit your brand and business and will co create that with you will cost your virtual human, you can even become one yourself. And and then we basically assemble that so that you can log on to our platform. And just by entering text and uploading a few images, you can create these truly immersive 3d videos presented by your virtual HRM system.

Kyle Roed:

It's really fascinating. And as I was preparing for this conversation, I was doing a little bit of research, and I was out on the website and looking at it. And I mean, these these characters look real, you know, they look like somebody that you would see in a some sort of like a training video or like on the news. So you know, it's really a fascinating approach, I'm curious. Is is, is the intent to create an experience a communicative experience? That feels real? And then people pay more attention to it? Is that really kind of the theory of the of the work here?

Natalie Monbiot:

Yes, exactly. So the premise of what we do is that talking to a real human, is the best way to communicate. In fact, face to face communication between two humans or small humans, is the best way to relate. That said, it's quite rare to be able to get into these situations, especially these days where a lot of communications are digitized. A lot of the ways that we engage are remote and digitized. And we also one to one communications don't scale in the way that businesses require. And for the amount of messages and content and communication that needs to happen. And so what we've done is we were doing our best to model that type of human led communication, and through AI to be able to scale, what we think is the best way to communicate and make that accessible to all kinds of people that don't have video production skills that don't have any coding skills, and they don't have the resources, the time, resources, big time or budget to create these types of human LED video experiences.

Kyle Roed:

It's it's really interesting because I feel like you just described my organization. It's like well, I don't I don't have a full learning and development department. You know, I have I have a few People that that help in that arena, I certainly don't have an on staff videographer. And the best that we've been able to do, we've tried a couple like types of software where it's like, it almost looks like, like stick figure like computer animation. And it's like, you know, it's kind of kind of like a cheeky video. And there's, you know, maybe some humor in there. And it's, you know, it's but it's like intentionally. cartoonish. Right. So this, this to me strikes as maybe a little bit more, you know, more, more real. And, potentially, you know, you'll get people to listen a little bit more seriously. So I'm curious. Go ahead.

Natalie Monbiot:

Yeah, we actually, because there's avatars that avatars, it's something that's pretty common and prevalent these days, I know that you recently did an episode on the better person, you know, better versus populated by the protagonist being avatar. So I think people are becoming familiar with that notion. We made a decision three and a half years ago, when we launched the company, to focus on photo real, virtual humans were appetites, and to emulate the expressiveness of a human being to basically engage in in a way that is more relatable in a way that you would engage with another human being. And we model the expressiveness of real humans in our appetites. And we think that that is a more powerful and personal, all that kind of friendly and professional way to communicate, versus kind of these more cartoonish avatars as well, what makes my best.

Kyle Roed:

It's really interesting. You know, it brings me back to the conversations that I have, and have had over the length of my career where somebody, somebody has a feeling that they can trust what somebody says, or not trust what somebody says, based upon their interaction, their nonverbals. You know, I've had this conversation a number of times where somebody feels like, I just don't trust what they told me. And then I tell them the exact same thing. They're like, Oh, that makes sense. It's like, I'm telling you the same thing. But I'm telling it to you in person, I'm telling it to you in a way that that you can, you can understand how, you know, how and why and that sort of thing. And so I think about that, in the context of scalability, you know, if you can make it personal, if you can, if you can have the copy, correct, you know, and have kind of the right message that you want to send, but then just send it in, in the way that a person can interpret it correctly, can be a really powerful tool. Am I onto something there?

Natalie Monbiot:

You certainly are. So that's exactly right. We're taking information which is primarily text based. So there's a endless amount of text of text in the world, and particularly in the world of business. And this text often really gets overlooked or doesn't get.

Kyle Roed:

No, you read that entire handbook before you signed off on it. I know you did, Natalie don't.

Natalie Monbiot:

And we know that people, I think this is that it's people digest the meaning of text, it's 10% compared with video, which is like 90%. So we know that messages can transmit be transmitted more effectively. In video, so we've chosen video as our medium. And we've chosen to make video really easy to make and bypass that whole process of being in a studio. Having, you know, videographer on hand, having to have kind of all the crew on location at the same time. And then kind of, you know, not just do that initial capture, but then also do the editing. We started with really the virtual human aspect to to basically remove friction to in creating presenting that video. But what we also found along the along the journey, to where we are today is that video editing. Once you've got you know someone talking on a green screen, actually integrating the content, integrating the backgrounds, making the video look finished, and polished and professional is actually almost just as challenging. And you will again need video editors and create a creative team to put that together. So the other thing that we've done is we've now launched recently I touched on earlier, these 3d immersive environments that actually have different shots. That would make up a total edited professional video, and you're able to just select them from the platform. So you can select Close Ups, you can select pan shot, you can select from a bunch of different sort of scenes and compose your video yourself without any skills.

Kyle Roed:

Very cool. Very cool. So We could take this like, we could, like, break the fourth wall here, like I could take the transcript from this podcast, I could put that into our one. And then I wouldn't have to do any sort of video editing. And I could have video without having to do video editing my understand.

Natalie Monbiot:

You know, that YouTube channel that you said that you didn't have, you didn't have that,

Kyle Roed:

there you go, you know what I'm just gonna, I'm gonna write that down. And you know that that could be kind of kind of fun. Oh, no.

Natalie Monbiot:

Well, along along those lines, we want to push that idea just a little bit. One of the things that you're able to do, when you make content, using code versus cameras, is it you're able to edit that content endlessly. So if you need to update the text, or you wanted to even translate the whole video into a different language with the same virtual human as the base of it, you, you can do that. So there's a kind of ultimate flexibility, then there's things that you can do, where you're basically changing elements of, of what that human being can deliver. So you're kind of breaking it down into different components, the voice, you can select your ideal voice, you can select your ideal languages, you can select your ideal personas, and you can kind of assemble your perfect representative, essentially, for your business. So again, that kind of gets into sort of really kind of an interesting kind of out there territory. But we're already there. In many ways, we've been doing Photoshop for a couple of decades, I'm sure at this point, Instagram filters, and filtering apps are kind of the default these days, and this is almost taking it to just evolving that. But in their kind of professional world, too, in a way that is designed to help you make really polished videos that look really good without the app without actually having the manpower to do it, I would say the old school way, the analog way. And now with these digital tools, you're able to kind of achieve that result or even enhance result automatically.

Kyle Roed:

It's really interesting. It reminds me of, you know, a number of years ago, I was trying to, I was trying to find a low cost way to do some some compliance training, you know, some some sexual sexual harassment, and, you know, kind of policy training and I had a, I had a PowerPoint, you know, we're HR people love our PowerPoints. And I thought, Well, I'm just gonna, like, I'll just go on to like the, you know, like some sort of recording software, I'll just record myself speaking over the PowerPoint, and I like slipped the PowerPoint, I just need to like, like, I can do this, I present all the time, this is going to be perfectly fine. And the amount of time it took me to go through because I kept screwing up. And it was like, and then I couldn't really like I didn't, I didn't have the editing capability to go back and cut it and reduce it and move it in. And I ended up like the the result of that project was I'm just gonna go buy something off the shelf. And but the problem with that is, if you buy something off the shelf, it is impersonal. It's not specific to your organization. And it might not even really have the message that you feel like needs to be sent. It's going to check a box, right? And so as I think about this, it's almost for me, it's like a, it's a nice in between where you do have something where you need to make sure the communication gets sent, maybe it's a compliance message, maybe it's a policy, maybe it's just a, just some sort of a communication or update on something related to the business. And you don't have time to do this on an individual level. It's it's kind of in the middle. That's that's that's kind of how I see this. So it's really interesting.

Natalie Monbiot:

Yeah, so actually interesting that you raised the point about trying to film yourself presenting.

Kyle Roed:

There's a reason I don't have a YouTube channel, Natalie.

Natalie Monbiot:

It also just when you're recording is like this is this kind of self consciousness, that kind of thing. Like, it's just a weird thing. But because of that, you're not the only person to have kind of suffered that. And it's not just that it's uncomfortable, and the result isn't what you wanted. You spent time equip basically reading a script, which you don't need a human brain and to be able to do. And so we look to do is Where where are you spending your time as a professional, where you don't need to be spending your time, where could you be coming up with the content that PowerPoint, the ideas for that PowerPoint, and then just have your virtual twin or another avatar narrate that for you. And they're all polished. They've been captured in really good lighting and makeup as relevant and all of that so they're ready to go. And we actually recently launched a feature specifically for PowerPoint presentation so you can upload your PowerPoint deck and easily format it to a recording with a As an avatar, essentially erasing the deck for you. So you're not the only you're not the only one. It's fascinating.

Kyle Roed:

I've just thought, yeah, it you know, for for an organization like mine, where we don't have a full time and kind of professional training person, you know that it just seems like this, this could be a really interesting, you know, next step, or even if it's just supplemental, so that you're not the one that has to do all of the orientation presentation, maybe you do it for four hours, and then you have four hours of on demand videos that your, your your new inductees have to watch. Right, you know, you could structure a lot of different ways.

Natalie Monbiot:

Exactly. I think that's a really good way of looking at it is like, how do you create a library of on demand content, that is high quality, and that is designed to be revisited a lot. And it's almost made for on demand, because it's achieving attention spans or watching on demand consuming on demand video are shorter than a live, even the live video experience. So we also aim to condense the information into as much as possible, and to make it as visual and rich as possible. And also, when you're writing a script versus talking. Ad lead, you don't say the arms or the likes, and the whatever it is so actually is more concise. And it's designed to be consumed on demand. And I think that is a great way to look at it. And I'll get back to my original point, which is that human face to face communication is still the best way to communicate. And it's what we model our technology and our product on. This is where this comes in is not to replace what can you communicating, but it's to be able to take on some of the heavy lifting, and generate more content, which is more which is in the end easy to me. And also very easy and hopefully enjoyable to see.

Kyle Roed:

Absolutely, it's, it's, you know, one of the things I want to talk about, it's, it's interesting, so and well, for anybody that's interested, we'll have a link in the show notes, you can, you can pop it open, you can check it out and see what we're talking about. But it the characters that you can choose from. So there's over 100 characters, and I thought it was it was it was pretty telling that you've got a really diverse slate of characters. And and the first thing that I thought is, you know that that allows you to actually lean into our implicit biases a little bit. And kind of use your, you know, the halo effect. for your own purposes, almost like it's like leaning in a little bit. So as you as you're like building out, like what these avatars look like, and you're like you're building these options, was that something that you considered kind of that diversity element of, of the trainer, the avatar?

Natalie Monbiot:

Yeah, absolutely. So what we want to be and strive to be as really representative in the actual humans that we provide, and that we want to be representative of the population, we want to be representative of the workforce. And we so that's one thing. And then we also want to be able to provide again, this is something that can be tricky for for an organization of various size, because it's finding the right combination and variation of representatives who are diverse in total. So we also aim to provide a large library always building this library of avatars that represent different ages, different ethnicities, different genders. And that is something that we were going to another 50 avatars will be coming out in the near future, and we're continuing to push the envelope in that direction.

Kyle Roed:

Yeah, it's really, it's really interesting. It reminds me of the we we've done some leadership training recently, and and we have a large, large portion of our workforce in Southeast Asia. And when we went through the training, we had some talk about, like business leaders. And so so instead of having, like, you know, Jeff Bezos, we had, like, Jack Ma, right. And it's like, and we like, we made sure that the pictures were, you know, kind of culturally appropriate and would be, and would resonate with, with, you know, the the folks in that geographic, you know, part of the world. So it's really interesting that, you know, you can kind of you can customize in that way, and my assumption is going back to what you said about code versus cameras, you know, you do have a little bit more flexibility to customize as many times as you need to, right.

Natalie Monbiot:

Yeah. And so, it's pretty important point about local, being able to localize your content, that you're learning materials, both in terms of the presenter, but then also the imagery that you're using. And the examples they're pulling in either in the voice in the narrative, or as visual examples and represented representation. And then also the language impairments. So that you know, in China, you could be delivering in Mandarin, with the same avatar or a different avatar, or you could even let people pick their avatar, I mean, there's many kinds of permutations. And then you can also keep your content fresh, because let's say you've got some training content, and it references something that happened this year, and you know, a year has passed, and that reference isn't the best reference or that reference is no longer a viable reference. And so you have the flexibility to keep your content fresh, without having to kind of go through the entire process, starting again. What I should say, though, add is that we are not replacing people, in many senses, first of all, human face to face communication, as much of that as possible, shouldn't happen. And then also, in another respect, we're very human first, in that all of our avatars rule by virtual humans are based on real people. And we have this really interesting business model of building a new kind of economy here, where everyday people, some of them, you know, might be actors in their real lives, or, well, they're not, but all kinds of people just interested in this as a side hustle. And they sign an agreement with our one. And they essentially make themselves make their likeness, make their virtual self available for hire by brands, who are the clients, the customers of our one. So this is really interesting kind of new economy building, where you can earn a passive income, kind of as a virtual human, which is a sentence before we would expect it to hear a couple of years ago. But yeah, this is something that I personally find really fascinating. And we're actually really starting to see that pick up not just in kind of our every day 100 Plus library of kind of virtual humans. But we also have now kind of influences who are really interested in this space and thinking about how they can scale that presence. And you're an influencer, your presence is really important. How can you start scaling that through the virtual twin? So again, like you the influencer, you in person? That's like the number one prized experience, but you know, there's a long tail of exposure and engagement that, you know, others might be interested in. So, yeah, in fact, just last, you know, just very recently, we have a futurist called ENB graft, and he, his virtual twin is actually delivering on a weekly basis, the futurist reports for a news company will define

Kyle Roed:

as it's pretty wild, but it's pretty on the nose there, the future is using futuristic technology to deliver the future is exactly

Natalie Monbiot:

matching. Like, it's kind of saturation. It's good.

Kyle Roed:

It's good. Yeah. That's fascinating. So So what does that look like? So I had to fill out like a visual resume to like, start to make money off of my virtual AI likeness. That's, that's, that's, that is such as super cool sub economy kind of a thing.

Natalie Monbiot:

Yeah, and it's phenomenal. How many people have signed up to be one of these virtual humans. And now we're kind of getting going on enabling it at scale.

Kyle Roed:

It's, you know, it's really fascinating, I actually think, you know, is, you know, when we talk about kind of, you know, innovation in this space, innovation in the HR space, there's so many different ways that you could leverage this, you know, and, but we have to think a little bit differently about, you know, what human resources is, and I think about this is like, for me, like you said, the face to face stuff, you can't get rid of it, right? Like, if I'm have to do some conflict management or mediation between two employees, I'm not going to have an AI bot come in and be like, I feel like you are upset. Tell me about, you know what I mean? Like, like, you have to do that yourself. But if I am delivering, you know, compliance training, or I'm helping an employee with a black and white like, you know, maybe there's an issue with getting logged into the system, or there's, there's a question about time off, or there's a question about pay or benefits or handbooks, or policies or travel and blah, blah, blah. Like if you could leverage this tool as long as you've got the documentation underneath it to support it. And somebody could have something that feels like a human interaction. And you could save yourself a ton of time because I know a lot of my My day is spent dealing with some of those things that you know what these are, like, just small things, and it's like death by 1000 cuts, it's like, you know, eventually, you just don't have enough minutes in the day to help everybody, you know, the same way.

Natalie Monbiot:

And safety, right? It's like, exactly, it's the handbook thing, but reading an entire handbook, it's just pretty a pretty daunting prospect. But yeah, and so being able to dramatize that, and exactly, you don't need you to communicate that, but maybe you need to find a better way to surface the information, right. And the best way to surface the information is maybe not view yourself communicate. So you're basically taking advantage of tools that we as human beings have at our disposal, and the whole new sets and tools being developed all the time to help you kind of manage that. But,

Kyle Roed:

yeah, it's really fascinating. And, you know, one of the one of the corollaries that I was drawing, before I hit record was, you know, it's, we're seeing this everywhere, like, you know, we're seeing this in media and, and movies, and, you know, they're, like, digitally rendering people who aren't even alive anymore. And and, you know, in, in various productions, I'm curious it, have you received any sort of pushback, as, as you've been, you know, working on this, and kind of rolling out this, this idea? Because it's pretty groundbreaking, I think, to a lot of a lot of your target customers, what, you know, what have you heard there?

Natalie Monbiot:

Yeah, I mean, what we're doing is pretty disruptive. So we expect pushback, sort of skepticism, certainly questions about what we're doing and how we're going about doing it. And, you know, like, is it real? How do you know it's real? Or is the fact that the human isn't real? Does that matter? And it's a very British huge question. And it's a very interesting question. I think, at the end of the end of the day, what we need to do is build trust. And the building of the trust is to do with, in the case of a company that is leveraging virtual humans, isn't, it's more like, Okay, so do you trust that company to communicate in a way that is authentic? And does that company want to find ways to communicate with you in a more effective way? Are they being transparent about the ways that they're trying to improve the way they communicate with you? Are they does the technology actually improve things for everyone consent? If it doesn't, then question why is, you know, in both in both in both camps, but if there is clear value, that I think people are actually just appreciative, and that's where adoption comes from? Like, where are you actually solving problems. And, and so those are the places that we look forward. And we've chosen the world of work to focus on because we think there is a lot to be done to enable more effective communications. And we work with authenticated companies that, you know, are established companies that operate within legitimate verticals. And so you're, we're, we're trying to kind of work with them to build solutions for better communication. So I think part of, you know, why we work with companies and why we're not a consumer product is that we think this is a really good place to prove value, and to build trust. But certainly, you know, always there's people that can be, not understand or have, you know, have their concerns about the way you know, content generation is going but the fact of the matter is, content generation is becoming more automated, whether you realize it or not, or whether you acknowledge it. So if you're familiar with Dolly, and mid journey, which are these incredible AI platforms where you can insert words and a magically, the, an image of completely fantastical, brilliant image is rendered based on the words that you input to the platform. I mean, that is incredible disruption in the way that we create stuff. But at the same at the same time. It's just a new tool. We had the we had the paintbrush, that pencils, and these are just new tools. And so the idea of is that real? You know, yes, it is it was just generated a new way, which is pushing the boundaries on what you considered. So it's a very interesting sort of space. I would say that the emergence of the metaverse in the last 18 months or so. emergence is definitely kind of removed a lot of skepticism, almost automatically. Everyone just seems to have bought into the fact that there's this kind of interconnected virtual worlds that we're going to be inhabiting. And people have really bought into that concept and quite a wholesale way. And if you can imagine that you're comfortable with that, then I think that's really kind of helps to break down like, Okay, well, what are the components that are leading to and building towards this metaverse? Part of it is virtual humans. I mean, you can pretty much not have a Metaverse without virtual humans. So very interesting times where we are with kind of blurriness, but also acceptance in a way that we have changed that we haven't seen for a while.

Kyle Roed:

Yeah, it's fascinating. I love this conversation. We could stay on this for hours. But you know, it's, I think it's a really important point. You know, I think, you know, there's a couple things as you were talking to make some really great points, you know, the whole question like, is it real wit, we always say, you know, perceptions, reality, right, especially in the world of HR, you know, it doesn't, doesn't really matter what happened, it matters what somebody thinks happened. A lot of times, and so, you know, the, the answer is, you know, is it real? I think that the, the answer is, Well, do you think it is, and if you think it is, then it's real to you. And that is, that is kind of, you know, right, wrong are different, that is kind of the world that we live in. Now. I also think that, you know, as I think about my employees who are gamers, or are heavily involved in the virtual world, you know, there could be a generational component there, you know, having something like this actually, could be a signal to them, that your organization is innovative, and is aware of these things, and is open minded to thinking differently and more effectively about how do we deliver communication content and those sorts of things. And, and I couldn't agree more, it all comes back to trust, you know, if you, if your actions don't, don't reflect, you know, your values, and then it doesn't matter what platform you use to communicate, you're gonna struggle. That's just

Natalie Monbiot:

that last point is very well said, I think it really is about authenticity. Yeah. So if you are communicating authentically, then, you know, you can communicate authentically, but using technology. So. So, yeah, so maybe a better question is, is it authentic? Or are we being authentic? Then, you know, kind of getting into the conversation about but is it real? And what people don't think it's free? Or things like that, but is it authentic? And I think a lot goes into authenticity. And a lot of that is, is branding, and just trust built over time?

Kyle Roed:

Yeah. And that way, you don't have an existential crisis, as you're sitting there. You know, racking, right. I'm gonna go and, you know, question my life now, but just an absolutely wonderful conversation, I just, I love this approach. I love that you're pushing the boundaries. And I, you know, I would just encourage, you know, for everybody that's listening out there to just think, think differently about how you deliver content and think about the types of things that you want people to have a personal touch, but don't have time to do a guarantee, there's a lot of those, you know, that that could be a potential application. So, that being said, We're gonna shift gears, we're gonna go into the rebel HR flash round. Are You Ready? Ready? All right, question number one, where does HR need to rebel?

Natalie Monbiot:

So I say this as a non HR person, and with full humanity, but I think, in general, and maybe not this audience listening but against itself, I heard a stat recently that it takes HR five to seven years longer to innovate than other functions. And so, you know, against itself, I would say, for the broad body of HR are based on that stat. But it really takes the pioneers and probably a lot of them are the ones that are listening to this podcast to drive that change.

Kyle Roed:

Absolutely. Five to seven years. That's, that's scary. I don't even like I'm trying to think like, how much was different five years ago, than today? Right. And if we're not, if we're adapting that slowly, then, you know, there's a call to action. So I think that's a really important perspective, especially from outside of HR. I think we need to hear that so I appreciate you sharing that. All right, question number two, who should we be listening to?

Natalie Monbiot:

So to contextualize this for an HR relevant audience, another slightly rebellious podcast in this space is chat and cheese. And so if you know people A lot of listening to that definitely worth checking out, in my opinion.

Kyle Roed:

Absolutely. And we, we can use all the innovators we can get if we're gonna move that needle from five to seven years a little bit faster, right? So, share that. All right, last question, how can our listeners connect with you and learn more?

Natalie Monbiot:

You can find me on pretty much all the social platforms. I'm on LinkedIn. I'm on Twitter as an app like that. And you can certainly visit us at our one.ai. And you can even try out a little free video there if you if you'd like.

Kyle Roed:

Absolutely, yeah, it's immediately after this. I'm gonna go like, like, create my video and see what see what my airbrushed avatar looks like, I can't wait. So I'm gonna pick a better voice, though. You know, I gotta figure out what voice I want to pick. But I really, really appreciate it. We'll have all that information in the show notes. So open up your podcast player, check it out and encourage you to take a look, Natalie, I really appreciate you spending some time with us here today some some really cool stuff and I appreciate you being on the cutting edge of communication.

Natalie Monbiot:

Thanks so much, pal. It's been a pleasure.

Kyle Roed:

Thank you. All right, that does it for the rebel HR podcast. Big thank you to our guests. Follow us on Facebook at rebel HR podcast, Twitter at rebel HR guy, or see our website at rebel human resources.com. The views and opinions expressed by rebel HR podcast are those the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of any of the organizations that we represent. No animals were harmed during the filming of this podcast. Baby

(Cont.) RHR 133: AI Onboarding with Natalie Monbiot