Rebel Podcast: Life and Work on Your Terms

Bonus Episode: Jaded HR Meets Rebel HR ROUND 2!

March 10, 2023 Kyle Roed, The HR Guy
Bonus Episode: Jaded HR Meets Rebel HR ROUND 2!
Rebel Podcast: Life and Work on Your Terms
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Rebel Podcast: Life and Work on Your Terms
Bonus Episode: Jaded HR Meets Rebel HR ROUND 2!
Mar 10, 2023
Kyle Roed, The HR Guy

Check out Kyle Roed, our host as he joins the Jaded HR Podcast:  

About: Jaded HR is a cynical look at HR by two Human Resources Professionals with over 30 years of combined experience.

This is not for the weak of heart. We actually say the things you really want to say.

WARNING!  Language alert!  Don't listen with kids in the car.  :)  

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http://www.kyleroed.com
https://www.linkedin.com/in/kyle-roed/

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Show Notes Transcript

Check out Kyle Roed, our host as he joins the Jaded HR Podcast:  

About: Jaded HR is a cynical look at HR by two Human Resources Professionals with over 30 years of combined experience.

This is not for the weak of heart. We actually say the things you really want to say.

WARNING!  Language alert!  Don't listen with kids in the car.  :)  

Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched!
Start for FREE

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.

Support the Show.

Rebel HR is a podcast for HR professionals and leaders of people who are ready to make some disruption in the world of work. Please connect to continue the conversation!

https://twitter.com/rebelhrguy
https://www.facebook.com/rebelhrpodcast
http://www.kyleroed.com
https://www.linkedin.com/in/kyle-roed/

Kyle Roed:

If you're constantly acting over and over and over again, it's exhausting. You will burn yourself out how many articles that we read lately about HR fatigue. The problem is human behavior. When you constantly consider your actions you screw up, you have to learn how to play your own music, or people will tell that you are not playing the genre that you shouldn't be playing. Here's a quote I love. If you tell the truth, you don't have to remember anything. That's a Mark Twain quote. And that's what we should all be striving to do. If we are faking it, we will fail eventually. This is the rebel HR Podcast, the podcast where we talk to HR innovators about all things people leadership. If you're looking for places to find about new ways to think about the world of work, this is the podcast for you. Please subscribe my favorite podcast listening platform today. And leave us a review revelon HR rebels.

Warren Workman:

I'm really excited for this episode. You may know Kyle from the rebel HR podcast two, three years ago, Patrick and I appeared on his podcast and now we're sort of returning to pay the favor with this but I had to reach out to calm when I saw his disrupt HR presentation. And I'm not saying this because I know call or anything. I think this is one of the top disrupt HR presentations I've seen. And I think as of last two weeks, it still has been the top five lists the last one since it got released two weeks ago or three weeks ago, however long it's been. So congrats on on that. So thank you. Oh, go ahead and tell us a little bit about yourself in about rebel HR, and then jump in.

Kyle Roed:

We're absolutely. So Warren, it's awesome to be hanging out with you feathers. It's great to meet you, man. I had warned at the time, Patrick on the podcast way back when this was like the middle of COVID. Quarantine and I was sitting in my basement hadn't left the house for like three weeks, you know, it was like the outlet. And it was it was a much needed outlet. And I'm just I'm glad you guys are still still doing your thing and sharing the truth of HR, which we'll probably be talking about that here in a little bit. But you know, myself, I'm an HR professional by complete accident. I fell into it like everybody else where you know, you weren't a complete and utter jerk. And they're like, Oh, you're good with people go to HR, because that person just got fired. That's pretty much how I fell into it. So oh, by the way, we need to hire 90 People for the holiday season. Can you figure that out for us? Thanks, Kyle. So that was my trial by by fire. And since then it's you know, I just haven't left despite trying to a couple different times. But I'm very fortunate in my career that I get to work for an organization called CPM as the Vice President of Human Resources, international firms super cool, super fun, great team got to essentially build the department from scratch, which was which was fun host. But then this thing happened called the COVID. And, and actually, you know, I just I was so isolated. I was the only HR professional running the COVID quarantine response, pretty small company. So I was me. And I needed an outlet, I needed people to talk to you, I needed people to bounce ideas off of and I needed to make sure that I wasn't completely losing my mind sitting at home. And so we, myself and a couple other local HR professionals, Molly predestined, Patrick Moran, who are my on again off again, co hosts started rebel HR. And the entire idea was how do we deal with disruption? How do we manage through the things that always happen in HR, that shit that we can't figure out? Plan for, and it's not on a strategic plan somewhere. And from there, we interview guests every week. We, I mean, I'm just so thrilled at the quality of guests that we've been able to connect with. And for me, it's like just an opportunity to just listen, learn ask all the dumb questions, which is the beauty of being a podcast host, you get to ask the questions, and nobody can tell you. They're stupid. And even if they are, and they think it's stupid, they won't tell you. So it's like, it's just out if you can edit it if you want to. Yeah, yeah. Although I'm kind of at the point now where it's like, you know, I used to do the and arms and the arms of the like, whatever. And I was just like, Screw it, whatever. It's just, you know, this is just me. So I don't I don't do that anymore. But yeah, we

Warren Workman:

didn't edit out the almost this podcast would be an hour and a half long.

Unknown:

Like, yeah, I want to go to bed. I want to go to bed. Warren Can we stop that?

Kyle Roed:

So yeah, so that's the podcast. And yeah, it's just been a ton of fun had the opportunity to do some speaking off of the podcast, and then yeah, I got to do disrupt which was our local disrupt that I actually founded with the same two co hosts, Patrick and Molly. We founded that a few years ago, as well. And so this was our first event post COVID here in December, so it's cool.

Warren Workman:

Yeah, we have not had a disrupt event in in my area in years. I did say it next time they have one I'll probably attend or, or something like that. I haven't seen it's been it's been years where at least my my neck of the woods. So hopefully, hopefully someone will kick that off again and do some business. What I love about the disrupt presentation is it's five minutes, you're not getting in, it's a pace five bits that are going, your slides are going with or without you. And I've heard so I haven't seen but I've heard some horror stories about that.

Kyle Roed:

But I've seen dudes, we add it up.

Warren Workman:

But your slides are going at your five at that five minute pace with or without you. And you're off the stage in five minutes and you don't get to hear the fake bullshitty stories that you know why HR is so important because their grandma on their deathbed said go be the best HR person in the world has ever seen in all this other things you the dumbest stories you always hear. Yeah, great grandma. And you don't get a sales Spiel out of it. I I really liked the format and what do you get what 1214 of them in in a day and it was five minutes a pop? Yep, you're out of there in less than two hours. Yeah. After transitioning set up and things like that.

Kyle Roed:

And you can drink when you do it. So it's kind of fun.

Warren Workman:

Yes, yes.

Kyle Roed:

I'm way better after a couple bourbons. It's way more fun. As far as I know.

Warren Workman:

I think there is others aligning. I think everything's better with bourbon.

Unknown:

There is a line now a couple bourbon is fine. Like several bourbons. Yeah, no, we're staying out. Yeah, the real real truths coming out.

Warren Workman:

So well. Also about rebel HR podcasts, you know, it is it is a different animal than jaded HR people might actually learn something there, get some great advice, build their network. Basically everything you're not going to get here at jaded HR. We're, you know, y'all y'all are did nice, classy restaurant establishment down the street. And we're that dive bar that, you know, we got the bare minimum of the health inspector to be able to stay open.

Kyle Roed:

I don't know if we're like fancy, I think we're kind of like, we're like, like Chili's or Applebee's level, right? We're like fast casual. You know what I mean? Like, you could take your family there. And you don't have to worry about like getting, you know, food poisoning. But you're not you probably don't want to take your first date there. Right? Like that's like a that's a virtue signaling thing. And they're like, this isn't the guy for me. You know what I mean? So I

Warren Workman:

like it. I like it. Yeah. So but you do have great guests. You do have very informative information in you've got how many episodes that you just told me two minutes ago? How many episodes are you all up to now?

Kyle Roed:

Yeah, today actually just reported that 152 So yeah, it's been busy was it's time I finally got my intro figured out.

Warren Workman:

Yeah, like I said, I haven't memorized mind and been saying it for three years now. So anyways, the reason I wanted to have you on was your your disrupt presentation about three weeks ago. And the like right after I saw it on LinkedIn. I went ahead and I messaged you, I said this is like the best. And I'm not trying to put down any other presenters on disrupt hrs there are some really good ones. You know, Suzanne Lucas, her friend has done some great ones, some of my favorites there. But a lot of them are not to be disrespectful, or to touchy feely got to your best and, you know, everybody loves you, everybody will love you and all this kumbaya stuff, but yours is this one was real. And it is being your true authentic self in HR. And I think that carries a huge message because so many people out there have this expectation of HR and personnel were the three of us are breaking that expectation were three dudes in HR way. That's that's definitely not the norm.

Kyle Roed:

We all have beards. I'm just gonna throw it out there. Mine is

Warren Workman:

a little more white than either of y'all.

Unknown:

But you got hair Kyle, that's the difference. You

Kyle Roed:

have hair. Yeah. Yeah, you could have hair feathers. I can tell could Warren I don't think so.

Warren Workman:

Chrome, Chrome, baby. Get the bowling ball polish out is that God? I do think it's it's legitimate. And it's what people in HR need to hear is I think so many people in HR, especially those who are just getting into the profession, they think they have to be that all things to all people. And the way to be a good HR person is to be that nice person who gets along with everybody and, you know, does things like that. So I thought it was just really telling. I think it's something that needs to be shared amongst the HR community. Very much so. What got got you going, what? What motivated you? What brought you to that theme or your target your subject for for your presentation?

Kyle Roed:

Yeah, so it's my second disrupt presentation. The first one was was touchy feely, and honestly, I was like the warm up act for the like, the legit speaker, Selena pyramid who's, who's awesome. And she had a great presentation at Disrupt. So I was like, you know, I was just kind of having a good time. This one, I wanted to take a little bit of a different angle. And what really, the way I thought about it was, why did I start the podcast, to drive change in human resources. I mean, that's really what what I was trying to do, that's the whole goal of what we're doing. And the other thing I wanted to do is take some of the, like, key learnings that I think HR people really need to hear specifically for their own self development that I've learned from guests. And there were a couple key guests, some of my podcasts that really reflected on the on the content that I put together. And so you know, so first of all, the best thing about my podcast is, it's like, this is completely unintentional. It's like, I get to learn some of the most like cutting edge research doctoral thesis, all these like crazy, smart people come on this podcast, to talk to dumb, Kyle about other really smart things. And so it's like, I get to like, it's like, going through an MBA course. And I'm not even paying for it. And it's like, super rewarding and enriching. And but, but there's a couple guests that just really made a really big impact on me. And what I found is there was a common theme between those guests. And it's, it's the guests that when you're talking to them, you know, they're, I don't know, can I could swear, right? You know, they're not fucking real. Right? Like, like, this is not bullshit. This person is telling me the truth, their truth, there is like, no question about what they are telling me. And the amount of passion, energy and integrity that they are telling me right now. And it's like, and I think, I'm guessing you guys have probably felt that too, here and there. Every once in a while, you get a guest, and you're like, this person's fucking legit. Right? Like it in. And so for me, it's like, well, so I'm trying to, like, circle that in my head. Like, how do I like, explain that to somebody else? And for me, my truth, like, what I actually wanted to be when I grew up, was a musician. And so I was like, and then I was like, You know what, fuck it. I, I started this, I'm the founder of this, I can do whatever the hell I want. So I was like, Well, I'm just gonna play guitar, and live out my failed Rockstar fantasies onstage. And nobody can tell me I can't write so so. So it's a little bit of self like, aggrandizing, you know, whatever, ego, but then a lot of it was like, How do I how do I translate that into something that somebody can take away? And so I, what I did is I took that music, which for me is like, truth, to the point that I have a tattoo with a microphone that says truce on my arm? And how do I like convey that to people in an HR setting. And so what I, the way that I thought about it was okay, certain people play certain types of music, certain people love certain types of music, certain people are just naturals in certain genres of music, like, you're not going to take Jimi Hendrix, and make him go play Hank Williams, Jr. Although he could, it would be weird for him. Right? Like, you know, um, yeah, I'm not gonna go play classical music, you know, and be a virtuoso, a classical. It's just not. So it's like, that was the first thing like, and you think about that? It's like, as I think about genre, for me, it's it's industry, it's company. It's team, you know, it's like, are you in the right genre? Are you? Are you? Is it just the right set? And then it and then it's like, that's the environment, right? But then it's about you. So it's how do you interact with your environment? Right? Are you faking it? Are you? Are you just full of shit? And acting the way that you need to act? Or are you authentic? And for me, and I don't get into this in the disrupt speech, it's only five minutes out of time to get into it. But like, for me, the personal story of that was firing somebody. Right? And I used to be, I used to be the correct quotation correct HR professional, when someone was uh, was stupid or made a mistake or violated a policy which policy might have been stupid. I flipped the switch. And I turned into like, Mr. Robot, Mr. Compliance, and I was just a heartless, soulless HR drone. And I would just fire people. And it was a coping mechanism, right? It was like you were compartmentalizing an awful situation that probably made you physically ill. But you're doing it in a way that you've been told you're supposed to do it and like Don't, don't show them too much emotion, they'll feed off that and they can sue you for you know, like, that entire kind of HR Industrial Complex was how I was brought up, right. And I had a profound moment where I got to a point, you know, I think you know, matured in my career, I kind of got fed up. And I actually empathize with somebody that I was firing. Right. You know, I was I was honest and open. I listened. You know, there's a, there's a novel idea. I mean, I shit you not at one point, there was a running gag, like a contest for how quick can you fire someone at one of my companies that shall remain nameless it was like, Oh, that was oh, that was 15 seconds, can you beat that, you know, like, like, awful. And what I found, though, is when I when I like, exhibited the traits that we should all exhibitors hear that it was better. And ultimately, that person's experience was better. And ever since that, it was like a lightbulb moment that like, Okay, I can't flip a switch and become HR Kyle, I just need to be calm. Right. And I think and that's, that's really the the underlying, you know, message in this entire presentation is, you know, be yourself. The human. That's what your organization's needs you to be. Not this mindless, compliance focused drone. That, you know, everybody hates, because hrs reputation sucks.

Warren Workman:

I mean, like, it's an understatement. Yeah.

Kyle Roed:

I mean, everybody hates HR. When I tell people I'm an HR, they're like, oh, oh, it's like it. So I tell so now, now, this is cool. Warren. Now I can tell people I'm a podcaster. Right? But But there's so many podcasters they're like, oh, that's all bullshit. Like, No, you're not like, you know, prove it. And then I'm like, Oh, look, I have 150 episodes. Like, oh, shit, you are right. Yeah. You know, so anyways, I have fun with that and bars. It's a good time. Got that?

Warren Workman:

You heard? We're in the top 25 of all podcasts in Swaziland and we'd spin for like eight weeks now. Whoa, on Apple podcasts, charts, like I've been reaching. Please Mr. or Mrs. Swaziland listener called Getting context, I guess.

Kyle Roed:

Is that one listener? Is that what versa? I

Warren Workman:

says yeah, it only takes to get the top 25 in Swaziland it takes like two downloads is Wait a second to be

Kyle Roed:

Swaziland I love you Swaziland. I am spreading the gospel to Swaziland right now. Keep listening. Keep listening. Tell your friends. Yeah,

Warren Workman:

I think it's it's it's give us a rating. Leave us a review Yeah, yeah, that's

Kyle Roed:

amazing. Good for you. I have no idea. Oh, really?

Warren Workman:

Ah, no, I don't Oh. Well, HR are more podcasting shop talk later. Yeah, good about this. So Okay, anyways, so you've really set set yourself up good and why should you've really set yourself up well, because I don't

Unknown:

there's a better educational I'm not I do. We did go to the same college so it doesn't make sense. We both talk like that

Kyle Roed:

yeah, I don't even want to ask where we'll go down a rabbit hole right here at the university. Go pars Carolina. Okay. Okay. All right. I got I got I got no context for I mean, they're they're purple. Right purple. That's all I got on that school.

Warren Workman:

Yeah, we're, we can play baseball. We're okay. Football. We play baseball team

Kyle Roed:

is alright. The other Yeah. Listen, I'm I'm an Iowa Hawkeye. So like, I've got no, I got no room to judge. I mean, I think we set the record for the lowest offense and the highest defense this year. And if you ever want to see like the most boring game of your life, that's it. Like 33 and our defense that was basically the entire season. So yeah, I got ya.

Unknown:

Old trauma. The sole reason right? I want to go see a game and iOS, I want to wave to the kids.

Kyle Roed:

In between. That is cool. The wave is cool. If anybody doesn't know so they wave. The Children's Hospital has an observatory that can see into the stadium. It's Kinnick Stadium in Iowa City, I would say credible. It's awesome. And it's like all the fields. And they always wave at the kids up in the up in the suite at the end of the first quarter. And it's like you watch it and they always show it on ESPN and stuff. It's just like, you know, there are literally kids waving in the window who are like hospitalized and dealing with some serious, serious medical issues. It's a really powerful moment. So yeah, to get to

Warren Workman:

know that's something fabulous. Yeah, but you'll also have or at least in the 90s had wrestling as well out there.

Kyle Roed:

We're number two right now. Little friend's brother's

Warren Workman:

little bit of wrestling. Oh, anyways, I'm crazy that no, no subject and just meandering everywhere but you set up your presentation really well.

Unknown:

And I got a warm Let me pause for a second. Let me go back for a second. So if you're talking about you being your authentic self during a termination situation, can you give me an example of what that actually means? Yeah, absolutely. So just share the story without sharing the details. So that's what I'm thinking about that right now. But it was it was a situation where I had an employee who had been on multiple written warnings for, for behavior, and just kind of

Kyle Roed:

shippi stuff, right, like, kind of getting, you know, rude with somebody else not being super respectful. Not, you know, just just not being a super great team player. But when you when you got this person, one on one, you talk to him, you'd realize that this is actually really genuine person, they just really suck it emotional. Right? You know, and I think we all know those employees. Yeah, but no, you cannot tell us you cannot tell Gary to fuck off. Right? You know, like, you gotta, like, you can't do that or close it. You might want to, I might want to, but I'm not gonna say it. Right. So, you know, we got to a point where we went through the whole disciplinary action process. And I just liked this person. I mean, yeah, they were, you know, they had their behavioral issues, but it's just like them, they were just, you know, they, I could see myself as that person. Or my, my buddies. Isn't that person, right? It was just like, it was somebody that I enjoyed. And so instead of walking down the script that I usually walked down, which was, well, we gave you this on this date this on this date this on this date, this happened on this date, therefore, henceforth, blah, blah, blah, legalese, you're fired. Bleep. I paused at the end of it. And I just said, Man, this sucks. I'm sorry. You know, that. I really liked you. But this just wasn't okay. You know, but I hate this. And it was that moment of like, honest, like connection with another human. That person just like, they were just like, Yeah, you're right. They just took complete Nutter ownership. And, but it was also a point of connection, where, you know, they, they also shared that, that, you know, they were having some issues at home, you know, they were working on it, they knew it wasn't okay. thanked me for being open and honest about it. And like, left, honestly left, like handshake, literally wishing the best. And, you know, still see that person around town, I'm pretty small town right now, like, you know, you can't, you can't be a jerk in my town, or eventually it catches up to you, you'd have to move like every five years. So you know that that moment right there, that moment of kind of humanity and connection. You know, it was pretty eye opening for me. And it was also way less conflict than when I would just do it the old way. Right. So it's kind of like, everything I was trying to prevent by doing it the way that the lawyers wanted me to do it was what happened when I did it the way that I just authentically do it. Right. And I didn't say anything that would have got us in trouble. I just said, I just settled, I was truly feeling in the moment in a way that allowed for some connection. Right? So that's, that's maybe a little bit more context of what I mean by being, you know, authentic.

Warren Workman:

I have a follow up question on that. So do you think that in your managing the person giving to their written warnings, and maybe pips or whatever you did, if you'd been your authentic self with them at that point, do you think that maybe they would have reacted better than our crappy got deal with fucking HR again? And no, yeah, no, sign this stupid piece of paper and get rid of things like that? Do you? Do you think have you been your authentic self with him at the earlier stages in the game, it would have made a difference later.

Kyle Roed:

I don't know. He really liked yelling at people. That, that I like to think that would have but the other truth is, you know, I wasn't the one delivering those corrective actions, you know, that really, the person shouldn't be, yeah, the person that could have been, you know, making that impact would have been the supervisor and I, you know, and actually, this, this is an interesting tangent, like, now, when I think about things like training and development and like, you know, how do I make culture better? Like, I don't, for me, it's like, the stuff that HR does, like the actual tactical stuff that HR does matters so much less than how your leaders are out in the field. So all like all of my focus is on like, how do I get my team where they need to be? How do I get my leaders where they need to be? How do I coach them up? You know, how do I prevent that situation from happening by trying to coach them on these Types of habits and traits and activities. And that's the, that's hard. That's really hard. And that's I think that's, you know, a lot of HR professionals who are hopefully listening to this for some some reprieve like, like, hang in there, that's it sucks, man you're trying to control, you're not only trying to control employee behavior, you're trying to control leadership behavior, and how they react to the employees. And it's like, you know, can only control so much so like, you know, just do your best.

Unknown:

That's, um, that's the more difficult part is controlling the management.

Kyle Roed:

Exactly. Yeah. Especially when you, you know, I tell people, my job, so, you know, VP HR sounds really cool, right? Like, it's fun, and I love it, it's on job. But a lot of my job is what I call ego management. It's like, listen, I know, this wasn't your idea. So let's, let's calm everything down and make sure that you think that it was your idea, by the end of this conversation, like, that's like, that's like, 95% of my job for. Like, doesn't always work. You know, I do have a big stick that I can be like, you know, fuck you do it. So that helped. That does help a little bit. Now. I didn't always have that.

Unknown:

That's what the VP comes in.

Kyle Roed:

Unless it's a C suite, and then you know, what, have a robust discussion.

Unknown:

All right, but I think they're probably the ones that need it most like

Kyle Roed:

sometimes. Yeah. Nobody in my current company ever. If anybody's listening to this, absolutely never have to deal with that. This I'm only talking about past employers with net. We don't have any issues with that. As far as you know.

Warren Workman:

As far as I love it.

Kyle Roed:

As last year, as I'm good at asterisks. I really like estrus Asterix my favorite punctuation.

Warren Workman:

Well, well, due to some copyright rate restrictions, we cannot play what you did on disrupt HR presentation, but you've graciously volunteered to go through to the five minute spiel, so we're podcasts you'll get to see the visuals, but I think this stands alone on its own. So Carl, you can take it away anytime you're ready and just give us your presentation. Right now.

Kyle Roed:

All right. So full disclosure, I have not done this for like, a month and a half. So we'll see how this goes. But it's gonna be better because it's it's Jade and HR so we can do whatever we want. Okay, all right, here we go. Here goes nothing

Unknown:

she loves Mama loves Jesus. And

Kyle Roed:

what did that do? Did you just have a feeling? Maybe you thought I suck at singing and why am I listening this podcast and that's okay. Music evokes emotion. What is HR? Do we are also supposed to evoke emotion. But what emotion Do you evoke? Are you Toby from the office? Are you oh shit HR is here? What do I do and what did I do wrong? Side now you probably do have a reputational issue. It's time to rebel. Billy Idol for you. The best musicians are rebels. So I asked you this, what genre are you trying to play at your organization? Here's the secret. There are only really like five chords that you need to play in order to play most popular music. I just played almost all music. The difference is how you play those five chords matters. Are you playing them like this?

Unknown:

Like this

Kyle Roed:

so got to ask yourself this question. Who are you as an artist, here's an issue. context switching is a problem. If your organization is asking you to switch from one genre to the next, every few minutes, you are going to screw something up, you will get tired. On average, it takes people about 10 minutes to get back into a productive workflow after being interrupted, so you might be playing a sweet solo. And then some drunk asshole says who for Uber. Sidenote, if you are a musician, you do have to learn how to play Freebird or you will get beat up at the bar. So make sure that you know how to play Freebird. But the point is, you can't do it all. You can't play every single genre for everybody. You have to find the right genre for you. And you have to find the right band members to play that genre. are with you, sidenote, always find the drummer, they are the hardest to find. Once you find your band, now you've got to deal with stage fright. Trying to achieve social performance is exhausting. But guess what, that's what HR does every single freaking day, we are onstage acting. Here's the trick. You can't fake it, you have to be authentic and you have to be true even when it hurts. If you are constantly acting over and over and over again, it's exhausting. You will burn yourself out how many articles that we read lately about HR fatigue. The problem is human behavior. When you constantly consider your actions, you screw up, you have to learn how to play your own music, or people will tell that you are not playing the genre that you should shouldn't be playing. Here's a quote I love. If you tell the truth, you don't have to remember anything. That's a Mark Twain quote. And that's what we should all be striving to do. If we are faking it, we will fail. Eventually, when I started my career, I thought I had to play everything in C major. Because it's pretty, and it's right. And it's like that that corporate headshot with the shiny photo that everybody wants. But the truth is that I should be playing a C minor. That's just me. That's who I am. So ask yourself this. How are you doing? Are you playing the blues on a Sunday? Because that sucks, if you've got the Sunday scaries if you dread going into work, guess what? You're probably playing the wrong genre. So do you need a bridge? A bridge is a contrasting section and music that gets people to go back to the return to the original material? Is it time for you to go back to your original material? Ask yourself that here's the thing, we can make a difference in HR. If we are our authentic selves. Oh, by the way, close it out on a badass power cord and leave a lasting mark.

Warren Workman:

Rebel? Awesome. Yeah. I really think the combination of the message and the music is, is what makes this presentation successful. And what makes it a must, must listen to must share. I encourage all of our listeners to go on the disrupt HR channel, you can share that video. I shared it to all of our dozen LinkedIn followers that the other day and I wish I could put it up on Instagram where we have more followers. But yeah, it's something that really does need to be shares. I think too many people just think they they have this is the role they have to play in this HR box. And I can't poke my head out or anything like that. And yeah, it's it's just really the real message that real HR people need to hear and those who are getting to that point you mentioned earlier, you were getting the point you were you're the robotic person but you you felt like your career had progressed in HR that you got to the point where you know what, screw it. Yeah, this this is the this is a screw it. This is what the legal the lawyers say I should do. But I know myself, I know my audience. I know what I, I know what I can and can't say and you know, that was you never say sorry, in a termination you never say sorry. Because that means you're admitting some sort of guilt or wrong doing or something like that, you know, figure it out for yourself, what know your audience know where you're going in, in, play by ear play to your audience and in things, or you be yourself to their audience, I guess you should say more or less, so you don't want to necessarily kowtow to them. But just just know the situation. You are a professional. That's why you're there. And that's how you're going to progress in your career. So that's like the least jaded thing I've ever said in on Jay Z. Dwayne gray to

Kyle Roed:

like inspirational war, we got to change this tone, what the hell's going on?

Warren Workman:

I don't know. I don't know if you did motivate me when I saw this. Like said, as soon as I saw it, I shot you an email, because I thought it was just it was perfect. So

Kyle Roed:

yeah, now it's now it's released to the wild, because it's like, like, disrupt doesn't have the copyright now. So you know, share away, it's all good. Ya know that? You know, there's a couple of things. As I was kind of going through that presentation, a couple kind of key points that I think we haven't really touched on, but like, some of the research is really fascinating. One is the whole context switching thing, right? And it's like when I learned about context switching, which is basically anytime you switch your task from one thing to another, like the whole, like, multitasking myth, right? Like it totally screws up your flow. You can't get back into a flow state takes like 10 minutes. And that's like, that's like my job description. Right? It's like, oh, this is no wonder I'm exhausted at the end of the day. So that was a really key takeaway. The other one, like for anybody, it's on a zoom call, was there was some really fascinating research on his doctoral research. And it's my absolute call making virtual work work. But the research showed that like, every time you're on a zoom call, you're fake. You're acting cuz you're staring at your face. And you're like, What does my face look like? And you're just like, and you just get so in like, like, you act like like, it's like when you're on camera, you different, right? It's like reality shows aren't reality, right? Basically, everybody's in their own like reality show hell, every single day when they're on these like teams and zoom meetings and stuff. And it's in its it's toxic, like it will completely exhaust you. That's why like, when you sit on an eight hour day, a zoom calls, you're like, you ready to like, go jump off a bridge, because you're so freakin burned out and tired of light. You know, but that's what it is. It's like your brain is not made to do that. So that's, that's kind of the other point. Right? But but in the context of, if you're constantly acting and faking and trying to be somebody else, it's the same exact experience, right? Whether you're on a zoom call or not. So anyways, I'll get off my soapbox now.

Warren Workman:

No, that's perfect. You know, unfortunately, Zoom calls are going to be going abroad, they're not going away. They're not going away. People fall so many people fall in love with them. And you know, this people still haven't learned this is a meeting that could have been an email or something like that. If if people actually read their flippin emails, that's, that's another the opening line of our disclaimer had you actually read the email is that people don't read the email, then go

Kyle Roed:

back to Astra like five Asterix in like action required read this email. Oh, yeah. And six if I have to that really work the next.

Warren Workman:

I'm going into open enrollment, and I've already put together my draft emails and action required you must do this, regardless of your participate or not. And this that, you know, comm closed open enrollment. I'm gonna get it. No, I don't participate. I don't need to do this. Yes, yes, he did. I've said that. 30

Kyle Roed:

days, and I just wrap that shit. God bless you. I gotta know. Yeah. Nine months.

Warren Workman:

Yeah, it'll be it'll be it'll be interesting. So well, well, cow. This has been a whole lot of fun. I'm so glad you agreed to join us in in share your thoughts on being your true self and in HR. Tell everybody where they can find you online besides your awesome podcast, rebel HR?

Kyle Roed:

Absolutely. So I'm probably most active on LinkedIn. It's Kyle K. Wiley. My name is kind of weird. It's Rhodes, R L. E. D, I'm pretty sure I'm the only Kyle ROED out there. But you can also if you want to check out the podcast. It's www dot rebel human resources.com. And you can use whatever podcast player you want. But yeah, we'd love to connect with anybody. There's a ton of really just super awesome people that I've had an opportunity to talk to. If you have any interest in some of those topics, I'd encourage you to check it out. But yeah, I just appreciate, appreciate coming back on you know, it's it's crazy. Warren it's been almost three freaking years. And we started staying about the same time. So this is just like, it's just like, you know, all the fields. We're just we're still doing it. We're here, man. Yeah,

Warren Workman:

there's been so many HR podcasts, even some that I really, really liked, that have come and gone. Gosh, I can name the host by getting into podcasts right now. Sue and Whitney. I can't remember their podcast, but I loved it. And then they just released like a 10 second episode. We've decided at that podcasting warming. Yeah, type thing and there's been some some Yeah, a couple come and go. And it's it's, it's not for everybody. And it is people don't know how hard of work it is to put a podcast together. So yeah, it's well you

Kyle Roed:

work harder than I do. I'm a lot lazier. I outsource all my editing and stuff. So

Warren Workman:

we we don't have the money for that.

Kyle Roed:

All right, that doesn't wait for Lady rebel HR podcast given to our guests. Yeah, follow us on Facebook at rebel HR. earlier. People congratulate our guy jdd website at rebel podcast player you he's an HR Rockstar,

Warren Workman:

and you can attribute a story or many of the organizations there's other ways you can help us grow and we have some new things in our tree. So go ahead and do that. You know, give you a baby. A sneak peek. I am working on an Etsy store right now for some jaded HR merch. So yeah, let's see. Yeah,

Kyle Roed:

love it. Can I get like, can I get like a Bejeweled like wind catcher? Like a jaded HR Win, win catch.

Warren Workman:

I will see what I can do. If you go on Etsy, there's a jaded HR store I think got like two things from prenta phi on it right now. So yeah,

Unknown:

even I'm learning something new today.

Kyle Roed:

That's awesome. That's us. I am checking that so I do not I'm going to have to get an Etsy account that I will check then

Warren Workman:

sell some merch Yeah. While we wrap things up I don't I guess our best practice for today is be a rebel and be true to your self in HR. Our intro and outro music is doubled by the devil by the underscore orchestra in old Andrew culpa if I can speak today is the voice our voice artists who does our intro our disclaimer at the beginning. So as always, I'm Warren.

Unknown:

This is feathers.

Warren Workman:

I'm ca and we're here helping you survive HR one WHAT THE FUCK moment editor