Rebel Podcast: Life and Work on Your Terms

RHR 166: Chat GPT for HR with Allyn Bailey

August 23, 2023 Kyle Roed, The HR Guy Season 4 Episode 166
Rebel Podcast: Life and Work on Your Terms
RHR 166: Chat GPT for HR with Allyn Bailey
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Show Notes Transcript

Guest: Allyn Bailey, Talent Acquisition and Experience Design Expert

Introduction:
In this episode of Rebel HR, we dive into the world of recruiting and artificial intelligence experience design with our special guest, Allyn Bailey. Allyn is a seasoned professional who has extensive experience in talent acquisition, recruitment marketing, and designing impactful experiences for employees, candidates, and customers. With her background in ethnography, market research, and organizational leadership, Allyn brings a unique perspective to the intersection of HR and technology.

Episode Highlights:

The Role of AI in Experience Design 

  1. Allyn discusses how artificial intelligence can be leveraged to enhance and optimize experiences for candidates, employees, and customers.
  2. AI can provide valuable insights, streamline processes, and improve decision-making in recruitment and talent acquisition.
  3. Creating Effective Recruitment Marketing Strategies 
  4. Allyn shares her expertise in recruitment marketing, emphasizing the importance of aligning marketing communications with the desired candidate experiences.
  5. Building compelling employer brands and effectively showcasing company culture are critical in attracting top talent.
  6. Change Management and Organizational Leadership 
  7. Training and Performance Consulting 
  8. Allyn discusses the significance of training and performance consulting in creating seamless experiences for employees.
  9. By understanding user needs and providing tailored training programs, organizations can maximize employee performance.
  10. Future Trends in Experience Design 

Conclusion:
In this episode, Allyn Bailey provides valuable insights into the world of recruiting and artificial intelligence experience design. With her extensive experience in talent acquisition, research, training, and organizational leadership, Allyn offers a comprehensive perspective on how experiences shape behaviors and influence outcomes across the business continuum. Tune in to learn more about creating impactful experiences and leveraging AI in the HR domain.


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Kyle Roed:

This is the rebel HR Podcast, the podcast about all things innovation in the people space. I'm Kyle ROED. Let's start the show. Welcome back rebel HR listeners extremely excited for the conversation today with us we have a Lynne Bailey. She is a talent futurist. She is currently the Executive Director of hiring success at Smart recruiters and we're going to be talking about all things futurism related to recruiting a Lynn, welcome to the podcast.

Allyn Bailey:

Hello, I'm excited to be here. Thank you.

Kyle Roed:

We're excited to have you with us. We also have Molly Podesta, Molly, thanks, as always, for joining us today. Oh, core. Alright, so one of the first things that I want to want to talk about a little bit is what got you interested in being a talent futurist? And ultimately working for your current organization, smart recruiters?

Allyn Bailey:

Absolutely, it's a great question, I should probably ask myself that question more often how they end up where I am today, you know, it's a long and winding trail. And I'm not going to give you the long story of it. But what I'll tell you, as I really have been spending a majority of my career in doing various forms of experience design, right, fundamentally taking my background and understanding of psychology and how people make decisions, combining it with some work early on in my career, understanding marketing, and kind of how we drive a marketing decision making and connected all that together and became really passionate about this idea of how do people relate to work? And in particular, how do people find the work that connects to them in the most relevant ways that they're most excited about? Right, and they're most passionate about. And I know that that, you know, in today's world, sometimes that feels a little pollyannish, to think about the idea of connecting people to jobs, not just because they need a paycheck, but because they find some some value in it for them, it builds them as a person, it connects them to the world, in really unique ways. But for me, that's what drives me. And that's why we're where I work. Now. Previous to this, I work for a multinational driving ta strategy. And that was actually my first realm that that 10 years actually focusing just on talent acquisition and in the talent acquisition space. Previous to that I spent a lot of time in employee experience and kind of connecting the dots on that part of the talent cycle. Throughout all of that, I have been deeply interested in the connection between technology and how we work. And how that connects to the story of us, as, you know, worker bee user or workers in the in the engine, how does that connect to the technologies that are available to us and how we operate with them? So yeah, so that's my was not supposed to be my long winded story, but is that's how I got here. And it's inherently it's all about the fact that I, one, Joe, to anything that I intended or trained to do, I have evolved everything. Day to day, I learned something new. And I'm in here and really just very curious. And I think that's probably how I ended up doing what I do.

Kyle Roed:

I love it. And I think, you know, if you are a, somebody who's interested in the study of human behavior, talent acquisition is a great place to work. It's just a great space to be in.

Allyn Bailey:

Right. It's like, it's, it's a hotbed of all the things that, you know, theoretically we think are happening from a human behavior perspective, even just you can look and you can see it in a very short period of time, all the core elements in play. So it's, it's a fabulous place to play around with how people met.

Kyle Roed:

Absolutely, absolutely. And sometimes I feel like the more time I spend in the talent acquisition space, or the longer that I'm in my career, I realized the less I know about human behavior,

Allyn Bailey:

right, that's exactly it. Right? Or sometimes you realize, oh, I knew that was going to happen, but I forgot.

Kyle Roed:

Right? Oh, yeah. I just like that five years ago. It happens, we're all we're all human. But what I what I want to really, you know, pick your brain on a little bit as is this aspect of technology and how this interplays into the future of talent acquisition and the work that we do in human resources and so you know, there's there's a lot of news in the headlines about about first of all things like recession coming and you know, there's there's ta departments where there's layoffs happening, and and now we've got this new kind of this wave of, of generative AI which could be, in my opinion, a little bit of a game changer from from where we've been in the past. So, so as you look at this whole, this whole picture in your space, how do you see the future of work looking? As it relates to the structure of how we acquire talent within our organizations? Yeah,

Allyn Bailey:

I, you know, I think he started to go down a really important path and start to lay this out it is, we're at a point in time when there is an intersection of multiple things happening. At the same time that we don't I think anybody who tells you they know how that's gonna play out, is lying. Right? Nobody knows. We all know from moment to moment houses all can play out, what we can do is, is we really alert to how all these things are impacting each other, and how that's in turn impacting human behavior, right, which is connected to you know, how people look for jobs, why they look for jobs. So I think the story here actually starts pre COVID. And I think that this is the story of individual empowerment at work, and how individuals were already starting even pre COVID, to question things like, how are decisions getting made? Why am I getting paid this amount? What is the what is the? What is my value here? What is my value in my relationship with this company? Right? Do I sustain it? Do I, you know, does it make sense to work one place for 50 years? Or should I only work there for 10? What does it look like to be have a degree or not to have a degree, these were all questions that we were asking and the downstream implications of that. And the TA space, pre COVID were questions like, Should we start having degree requirements? Should we start getting rid of those? How do we start to apply assessment so that we're not looking just at skills, but we're also trying to psychometric assessments, these things were starting to happen, right, we're starting to see innovators starting to work in that space. COVID happen. And the implication of that was, we learned a couple of things. One, we learned that our ability to change our work processes were more adaptable than we ever thought they were. Right, we literally the entire world changed the way in which it worked. And the way in know, the expectations it set for itself in a 48 hour period. Right. And everybody listened. I don't know how many of you I myself had spent years banging my head against the wall, listening to people tell me that change takes a long time. Like, well, yeah, it does sometimes. And sometimes it does all depends, right? Yeah. So we learned a couple things, we learned that people were already as examining what their relationship to work was, we now learned that people are much more adaptable to change than we realize, and that the change in how they operate and think about work was could happen at a much more in a much quicker pace. Right? So people were playing with the idea of remote work, hybrid work before COVID happened, suddenly, the all the mythological barriers around why you couldn't do it went away. And now people started to realize, oh, maybe I like this. Maybe this operates differently. Companies now had to start thinking about when it's time to go back. Do we retrofit back to our old way of working? Are people even be able to do that? Or will we have to look forward to anyway. So I started here by saying the first issue that we're dealing with is individual's relationship with work and their expectation of what work is to them, how they work, where they work, and when they work has fundamentally shifted and finished shifts a long time in the making, right. But now we've had a kind of a crisis or a pressure point, that has sparked a faster change in the space. Now we combine that with companies from a financial perspective, who are now looking at talent, and are back in their cycle of realizing that they have to one they need talent that is based, that has skills that will evolve over time, versus talent that is stagnant in very specific jobs or roles, right, I think it's impossible to say today, particularly in the knowledge worker space, that you can walk into a role today and expect that your job description isn't going to adjust or redefine within the next six to eight months of that job, right? Because that's just a constant. And that sets a new wave of pace of change within the business. And the business leaders are looking at it saying I'm less concerned about a job title somebody's had, but the skills that they're bringing to me and their ability to look forward and say what skills do I need in the future? So that changes the dynamic of workforce planning. It changes the dynamic of how we assess talent. It changes how we think about learning and development. So it kind of fundamentally shifts the relationship of what the company needs. So employees or talent has shifted what they want from their relationship. And companies have shifted with Dave Want from the relationship. But none of us are talking to each other about that yet, by the way, we're all just kind of squirreling around each other, pretending that nothing has changed, right. And then you add the third core element, right, which is technology and the advances of technology to allow us to approach problems that we've had or situations that we've had for a long time, less new ones that are now emerging, and be able to solve them in different ways than we've done before. The fundamental shift for generative AI from my perspective is monumental not just in the talent space, but across the working world. I think we clearly need to understand the difference here. For those of you who are tech junkies, like I am, it took me a while to catch on and realize that generative AI isn't just like a new cool buzzword. But there is a fundamental difference in how it operates. I was in the early days of doing natural language processing work trying to bring a chatbot into an HR support organization 15 years ago, and I remember going through the hassle of trying to train it, right. That was before we even knew how to do it at Mass right with with the things we have out there today. And I left that experience saying I'm never doing this again, this is the most ridiculous, worthless point of effort ever. Right? That was also the time period where I looked at somebody I worked with, he was really hot on QR codes, and told them, nobody uses your dark, your QR code quit trying to tell you to put it on things. Right. So what do we know today? No, I was wrong in both cases. Right. Today, even before generative AI, natural language processing and chain and trainable AI, machine learning based AI systems. And algorithms have become really predominant across the industry. We see them all over the place and everything from how we source to how we screen to how we communicate with candidates. So that's already in place. We also know things like triggers, or the ability to pull up old technologies like QR codes, and etc, that we thought maybe weren't really viable, became really viable when the environment changed, right. And people suddenly didn't want to hand out menus, and suddenly, we're using QR codes, right? I mean, who knew I was gonna have like, five QR code readers on my phone. So So those things are changed. Now. Now you start looking at so the how we use that technology has changed. And then you bring in something like generative AI, which fundamentally can solve and do a lot of these things that we've been trying to do with an algorithm or it's not the right word for it, but non generative AI kind of AI that we had to train, right. But it can do it quicker, faster and more effectively. Because what's the fundamental difference? It trains itself. So as somebody who was in the early days and had to train this thing, I can tell you, that was a pain in the butt. And that was filled with bias, I would have told people up and down, that using AI to do things like screen candidates or to make selection choices was a bad idea, because it was always fundamentally flawed, because it would require humans to train. And humans are fundamentally biased, right? So it only became more bias, not less, we knew that we saw that with the early. The Early versions, what came out with Amazon and others years ago, generative AI is fundamentally different humans do not need to train it. What we have done is scientists have actually built ways for to learn and to build mechanisms to train itself. What does that mean? It means that it starts to walk around or work around some of the concerns around bias that we had, its ability to learn, or to be able to adapt to different types of tasks that we asked it to do, is 10 times 50 times faster than what we've seen before. And its applicability in different spaces becomes pretty big. Right? The impact to us as a as a talent world is a couple things, right? One, we're now at that precipice where we get to make that decision, are we going to do what we did when APS first came out? And just take paper advertising and put it onto an ATS system? Right? Put it into technology, just use our old process and move forward? Or are we now going to look at the technologies and the advancements in front of us the changes in the dynamic between what businesses need and what talent is looking for, and actually use this as an opportunity to change not just the technologies we use, but our overall process and solve some of those bigger problems we've had? I think that's what we're in.

Kyle Roed:

Yeah, absolutely. You know, I think it's, it's fascinating and for somebody like me, so you know, I don't I don't claim to be a tech guru by any means. But but the, you know, it's fascinating to think about this being different because you don't have to train it. And I remember, I remember those chat bots and it's just like, No, that's not what I asked. No That's not No, no, don't do this. No, it's this. No, it's this document. Not that I know that's the wrong policy. And, you know, I've been playing around with with some of this generative AI and some of the things that it pulls out. It's like, oh, yeah, I didn't even think about that. Yeah, that makes perfect sense cooking. How does this change the context of the question that I was asking? Or the or the, or the article that I was that I was thinking about? It's pretty fascinating. I'm curious to understand, you know, because that has always been the argument about AI. And recruiting is the bias issue, right? Because Because people train AI, we are inherently biased. AI is inherently biased. So. So as we think about generative AI is, is it possible that it's actually because it's less biased? It's actually better at selection than we are as faulty human beings?

Allyn Bailey:

I think that's a reasonable hypothesis. I and I know that and I say this, right, I'm going to say a couple of things here that are going to make many friends, many of my friends and a TA world want to shoot me. Right? Don't please do. But the first is one. Yeah, I think we're in a space now where, if done, right, the technology is going to be better than us and making choices and decisions. And we're going to have to learn to rely on it differently. So now my question become things with technology that are different, right, I had worked with a brilliant individual, I think, Tyler weeks, he's now running analytics, I think, at Marriott in the TA space, worked with him for years. And one of the first things that he told me when we were starting to go into the early spaces of using technology to take over sides of people process and TA was he said, We need metrics, and, and ways in which to measure the effectiveness of technology, the same way we measure the impact and effectiveness of people in the process. I think that to me, has stuck with me. And as we start to go into this new era is exactly what we need. Right? So now the question becomes, maybe it can make better decisions, we need to actually test that hypothesis, we need to put that out there and not be afraid of it. And not to kind of be ostriches and put our heads in the sand and say no, no, no, people are always better. Maybe they're not. Right, maybe there's better ways for us to be leveraging our humanity than their rights. When you think about that. The same thing, the same question comes up from you know, my friends in the recruitment marketing space, who will in the content space, I don't know about you. But as I go through LinkedIn and look at people's, you know, comments around chatty B, I can tell you right away, whether they're a content writer, or whether they and that's what their job is, or whether they're just an enthusiast, right? The content writers inherently or an Eberly will tell you, in their post listening can never sound as human as I can sound. You're right. It can't. But at the end of the day, let's think about it. For most companies, and most businesses, they don't have the time, money or resources to have a human who's writing for them in the first place. I mean, we've had the issue of providing feedback to candidates for like the beginning of time, right? What are what are we afraid of by now letting generative AI actually go in and summarize interview notes with a couple of guidelines we can frame it with actually provide relevant feedback to candidates. What we're worried it doesn't sound like the human who wrote it, I bet it probably will sound better, because we did before than likely,

Kyle Roed:

better than someone stumbled over there was words and like, try not to hurt someone's feelings, right? Yeah. But to me,

Allyn Bailey:

that's an example of where we have to as a as an industry, realize that we need to take our heads out of the sand a little bit and not be afraid that it is going to force us to think differently about what we do, the value of it and how we view it, and to think differently about what our roles now become, in helping support that and there won't be a role for everybody. But there'll be new roles that we didn't know of, too. So if we start going there, we can move faster. I'm always moving faster, which is probably drive people crazy. But yeah. Looking forward with future of talent acquisition, what do you see from those roles being? So I'm gonna give you a couple that are recently just coming to my attention. First off, prompt designers, people who can build appropriate prompts to make these these AI engines produce the best results. You know, there's a whole cottage industry being created around this, I had no idea. I have no idea because I start I'm doing I've been doing some research to go out there and get services, people provide TA services into my our marketplace. And I'm realizing that there are people who have been in the technology integration space who are now going into this prompt design space and like Okay, that's interesting, that's new. I think that you're going to need more experienced designers, I think people who are able to examine and evaluate the experience and decide what type of experience they're wanting to create. and how to measure and test that experience. I think you're going to need more people who are competent at connecting the dots between multiple systems. So those are you know, your to your traditional ta ops roles. But let's talk about them in a little bit richer sense, right? Their ability to build data, lakes connects data storage to be able to translate data. Now, the good news is technology allows us to capture a lot of information. The bad news is we still have not been really good at understanding how to tell a story with that information that's meaningful to us. I think those are the sorts of rules that are going to increase. And I think that yeah, I think those are, those are the spaces, thinking about how people now insert themselves in a way to help lead drive the path for process design, how to connect the technologies and how to be able to analyze the output of technology successfully to understand what to do next.

Kyle Roed:

Yeah, I think that's fascinating, reminds me of, you know, when I was a kid, and I was like, picking my career day like Job, you know, like, hey, I want to be a police officer or a doctor or whatever, and they're like, and then there's the stat that like, however, many percent of jobs don't even exist, that that will be available when you graduate college and like, you know, prompt designers, one of those like, what you write, you write sentences for AI to generate stuff.

Allyn Bailey:

But you wonder, which fascinates me is it said it's organically happening. So I have a I have a teenage daughter, she's she made up her freshman year in high school, and trying to decide what courses to take or, you know, what is she interested in and etc. And I'll tell you, it's hard for me as a as an adult to have a conversation now that says, this is this is what's the this is where the leading matches, this is where you should be thinking about moving your your careers and your interest towards and you start thinking about Jimena. Which your colleagues major be I am. I don't think we have any I think it used to be we didn't kind of know but everybody, there was a few basic areas. Now I think it's completely evolving. Now I will tell you is she probably be an excellent product designer. Why? Because she figured out within weeks of chat GBT that there were a whole bunch of different extensions she could get for her different social media apps. And she has, you know, an entire life based on building prompts and connecting information and stories using these generative AI models, right? I'm like, Oh, my God, I have no clue. I have to go to her and ask her how to do it. So that's what's gonna happen, right? These are these things will evolve, the rules will happen. And it will be people like supernatural. Randy, go quick. Somebody tell me how to do this help. Help me?

Kyle Roed:

That's a good point. Yeah. But yeah, I would have to think about that. As I think about my eight my HR org structure future state, like generative AI prompts designer, although I have a few younger people on my team, I think would probably rock that role. Real real quick,

Allyn Bailey:

right? The problem, like I said, again, probably know how to do and we just never gave it like a sense of importance. Right.

Kyle Roed:

Right. Right. Do you think it's fascinating, you know, so and, you know, going back to what you talked about the people who are the content creators, who are, you know, professional editors, copywriters, and, and have done a wonderful job over the course of their career. Now being concerned about, you know, this, this generative AI coming into the space, and, you know, really kind of changing the structure of organizational and societal communication, I do also wonder if it's just part of this is, you know, grammar and, and some of the things that we used to care a lot about, it doesn't seem to be as important anymore. It's more about, it's more about delivering the content in an efficient and effective way, as opposed to delivering it in a an elegant or, or, you know, flowery way, I, I wonder if that's what we're going to continue to see in the space.

Allyn Bailey:

I love where you're going with that. So it's a great example of where we can start to see what's happening just societally and start to see it translate into the world of work. Right. So where did how do people communicate? How has it shifted? Right? You know, I remember it used to be on the phone. Right? So that it was about kind of, I mean, I was taught how to answer the phone as a kid by answering it with my, you know, is yeah, this is the SO and SO resident, so And so speaking, right? You imagine answering the phone like that today? Now, I see that and most people go, I can't imagine you answering the phone calls, right. And then we moved into emails and emails, were these, you know, very crafted, we had to be really careful about how we constructed them. And then people started using text messages. And now they're using things like teams and slack and it's like a ongoing constant communication that's half built by emoji, right? Our whole version of how we communicate to each other is shifted, which means what? How we like what we need in order to communicate to others has to Jeff, you so great content creators, I listen, I am a I love to read I am a, I spent a lot of time adapting and looking at literature, I think it's important. I think it's important for our culture. I love great writing, I like to write myself, I consider myself a writer. But I understand in the world of work, that may not be my value add anymore.

Kyle Roed:

Yeah, I think it's it. It's powerful to think about it that way. But I think I do think this is kind of the reality and specific to the human resources function, we need to be wide open to this, what could be a fairly big change in our department as well and be aware and embrace it? Because, you know, I think about it, something as simple as organizational communication. You know, a lot of times corporate communication is owned by the HR person, you know, what small company certainly gets delegated to us quite a bit, you know, larger companies might have a communications department. But if there's a tool that can help me more elegantly communicate to different audiences and tailor that message more efficiently, then that's it. I mean, I look at that, like, Oh, that's a great use case, right. And then I think about my organization is international, if I can take this generative AI, and translate it more quickly and more effectively, so that it's in the vernacular of the local group that I'm trying to communicate with, then, boy, I just, I just 10x my communication capabilities. And, and, yeah, I, I checked a really big box, that's been a pretty big struggle for me for years, right.

Allyn Bailey:

And the good news is, you can do all those things. I know, because they just literally did that. In an attempt to launch something I, you know, we're a small and scrappy team was launching a new program. And I realized that none of the communications had been written or crafted about it. And I was like, I do not have time for this. I have to like, answer, you know, work emails, I gotta deal with what's going on, on Slack, etc. But I gotta get communication out. And so as that was actually part of what prompted me to get into the chat, GPT thing, I was like, I'll fine. I'll open it up. Right? It's not going to be any different than anything else. And I literally, within moments, realize, Oh, my God, I can do all the things you've just said, save me time, effort, focus and create something that's better, more predictive and more valuable to my end user. Like, okay, awesome. Awful. Yep. Right. And I think that's for all of us that moment where we all have to kind of go, Okay, what problem does it start to solve for us, it's very specific to a thing we meet. And then we start to see what it can do for others and start, we start to feel more comfortable going out and leveraging it. Do you guys have a lot more knowledge and expertise than I do? And I'm assuming there's gonna be other HR professionals out there like me? So for us who don't have all this insight? What should our takeaway be? What do we do with this information? And where do we go from here? So I think the very first thing I would tell people to do is, realize that there is a distinct difference between generative AI and AI, that we've kind of used in the past and go in, it won't take you very long. I'm not listen, I know I speak like, I'm a technologist. I'm not I couldn't go to thing to save my life. But what I can do is I can go do a quick Google search you can to, and find a couple things and just just read one or two things, to start to understand the distinct difference, and then let it sit with you. So you can start to think about what that means to your process. I think the other thing I would tell people to do is really the takeaway I would have is, you have to look outside of your immediate processes role job, in order to understand what you could be doing next, or what you should be focused on next you have to fill, you have to start expanding your expanding your view so that you're looking at what's happening in the economy, what's happening in, you know, how people are relating to communication, how people are relating to their consumer interactions, you start to see changes in how websites are designed. You don't have to know I'm not telling people that you have to like, you know, be really focused and have like a, you know, a notebook where you're taking notes on all these things, but you should be putting some time aside in your mind to look outside of your day to day, see what's happening in the world and ask yourself the question, how could that impact what I do today? Or what do I see coming in? Based on what I just saw happen with the Amazon site? Right. Yeah, I think that's great advice. I mean, for for us that want to, you know, needs the leader organization. We have to have that information. So perfect. Good way. Thank you.

Kyle Roed:

Well, I think the reality is if you don't take some time to educate yourself, somebody else in your organization is I guarantee you, some of your employees are already using this stuff. Whether you realize it or not. There's an interesting I think a little bit of an ethical debate that's that's probably going to occur within our organizations in our industries. But then at the end of the day, as as people professionals, we need to be wide awake to the the fact that the landscape is shifting as it relates to talent. And if there's a tool that could either replace us or empower us to be more effective efficient, then we need to be at the forefront of this because that what for me, the difference between AI and generative AI is distinct? And I think this is I actually think the HR professionals that figure out, okay, how do I leverage this tool effectively, and get out in front of this are going to be significantly more successful than those who are afraid of it and just say, Oh, this sounds like another passing fad. I don't know how this works. I think this is bigger, much bigger than that.

Allyn Bailey:

I agree with you 150% 100%. As long as I'm getting questions, and this happens frequently, professional HR organization, everyone's all ping me for questions, when the questions are still. Should I be concerned? If somebody's using chat GPT to work on their resume? Or should I be concerned if somebody's using chat GPT to respond to an assessment question writer at school, they're asking questions about whether they can use it to do reports. My answer is, if that's true, if that's what you're worried about, you're missing the point. Because you can put all the rules you wanted to place people aren't going to do that. So just let that go. Let your control and, you know, over processed mind, let that piece go. And now instead, think about what does this mean to how people think about how they do work? Right?

Kyle Roed:

Absolutely. So here's a little fun thought exercise for you. So I just went into chat GPT. And I said, write a resume objective for Kyle David Road, HR professional. Here's the objective it this literally took me two seconds is yours. Highly motivated and experienced HR professional with a proven track record of success, implementing strategic HR initiatives, optimizing talent, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. I guarantee you, if somebody knows how to use chat GPT it is being used to write resumes right now. It just accelerates like, it's of course happening.

Allyn Bailey:

For you all the power to them. In fact, I would love it if somebody would like put on the top 10 written by Chet GPT. It's in my mind, we should look at that and go hot damn, this person knows what's happening, and knows how to write prompts. And I'm going to need a prompt writer soon. Now, you know,

Kyle Roed:

I optimized and maximize my time efficiency by utilizing chat GPT to write the resume you have in front of you. That's right,

Allyn Bailey:

exactly. All details are accurate. Like smarter, harder. That's exactly it. Right. Because what are what are we always what is what are our businesses always saying that they want to get productivity out of everybody? Right? Let's get there.

Kyle Roed:

It's not Yeah, it's, it's, it's something to embrace, in my opinion. Now, I do think that I think that in the talent acquisition acquisition space, specifically, it is going to become a little bit of an ethical discussion and ethical dilemma, I do think there's a little bit of an identity crisis that might might be occurring for a talent acquisition professional that has cultivated their craft for decades. And now they're being challenged by by generative AI. And so I'm foul be fascinated to see how this continues to evolve in that space. And I guarantee there's probably going to be more and more and more tools that that come to the forefront based around this. This principle. So fascinating to see what happens. Yeah, I agree. And we'll see if we use QR codes in another five. Yeah,

Allyn Bailey:

I'm telling you. Right. Yeah. That's my that's my big aha, what I missed.

Molly Burdess:

I wouldn't have got that one either. No.

Kyle Roed:

Yeah, I still I still the first time I saw on an on a restaurant. I was like, oh, QR codes. That's so like, that's like vintage

Allyn Bailey:

for Sue. Like, any something right? Or like early 2000s. Like really? Yeah. Yeah. I

Kyle Roed:

was like, oh, yeah, I forgot about those. And now yeah, now they're everywhere. Now. They're everywhere. So this has been an absolutely wonderful conversation, I think, you know, really a poignant topic. It's something that I think it's a good challenge for all of us to be to be aware of and get knowledgeable about. And so really appreciate you enlightening our listeners. I want to shift gears and I want to get into the rebel HR. Wash round. Are you ready?

Allyn Bailey:

I'm ready. All right, here

Kyle Roed:

we go. Question number one, where does HR need to rebel?

Allyn Bailey:

Where does HR need to rebel? In our metrics, we need to stop using the same old transactional metrics and start getting into the big Business of connecting our value to business value, cost per hire time fulfill time to fail are not business metrics. Those are transactional capacity metrics, which tell us nothing about the value we provide to the company that we're working with. So what is one metric you'd recommend? I would recommend? Not I'll give you I'll give you a couple, right? So instead of time to feel I think velocity is an important one. Velocity means I'm not worried about how much what is my average time to feel I want to know when a role needs to be filled, and was able to meet the deadline to hit that roll. And they can have a variety of different deadlines, right. So your velocity allows me to take that same component, but connect it to the business value, which is having people in seats when you need them to accomplish the work. So that's what will give you that was, okay.

Kyle Roed:

All right. Question number two, who should we be listening to?

Allyn Bailey:

Um, so I've got a million on my list. But I'm gonna give you three voices that I listened to. One that's in the HR space and two that are not are not necessarily. So from the HR space, I will tell you if you haven't yet. You need to listen to Cornelis. You need to hear what he's talking about in the DEI space. It is an honest, empowering and really impactful voice. And I think as we think about we're talking about technology here, but it's also about how we relate to who we are at work. And there's a lot happening in that in that space. He has some interesting voices. The other two I'll give you actually come maybe more from the experienced design space. The first is Brian Solis. Sol is Who is it Salesforce now but he's been a tech futures for a long time. He's really, really driven a lot of work around building experience journeys and understand the impact of technology to those experience journeys, really fresh stuff he constantly has there. And then like my new favorite to troll on LinkedIn, everywhere else is Heather McGowan. She is a keynote speaker speaks a lot on the future of work a lot on human capital, really about the new paradigm of work. And I think she's got some really cool stuff. So in my mind, those are my top three at the moment. Love it, love it. Perfect. Last

Kyle Roed:

question. How can our listeners connect with you and learn more?

Allyn Bailey:

Oh, absolutely. Great. Well, you can connect with me on LinkedIn. Elaine Bailey, al l y n bhi le y, I would tell you to connect with me on Twitter, but I'm not used. I've been really bad on that lately. So just connect with me on LinkedIn. That's probably the best place to get hold of me. And then if you want to reach me directly, I'm you're welcome to email me. I am a doc bailey@smartrecruiters.com. And I love to chat with people.

Kyle Roed:

Perfect, and we will have all that information in the show notes. Thank you so much for for spending some time with us today and enlightening us and educating us on some of the things that might be coming in the near future in some areas that we need to be focused on human resources. Thank you so much.

Allyn Bailey:

Thank you very much. It was great.

Kyle Roed:

All right. That does it for the rebel HR podcast. Big thank you to our guests. Follow us on Facebook at rebel HR podcast, Twitter at rebel HR guy, or see our website at rebel human resources.com. The views and opinions expressed by rebel HR podcast are those the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of any of the organizations that we represent. No animals were harmed during the filming of this podcast. Maybe